Archive for the 'OpenStack' Category

Fixing webcam flicker in Linux with udev

I recently got a new Dell XPS 13 (9360) laptop for work and it’s running Fedora pretty much perfectly.

However, when I load up Cheese (or some other webcam program) the video from the webcam flickers. Given that I live in Australia, I had to change the powerline frequency from 60Hz to 50Hz to fix it.

sudo dnf install v4l2-ctl
v4l2-ctl --set-ctrl power_line_frequency=1

I wanted this to be permanent each time I turned my machine on, so I created a udev rule to handle that.

cat << EOF | sudo tee /etc/udev/rules.d/50-dell-webcam.rules
SUBSYSTEM=="video4linux", \
SUBSYSTEMS=="usb", \
ATTRS{idVendor}=="0c45", \
ATTRS{idProduct}=="670c", \
PROGRAM="/usr/bin/v4l2-ctl --set-ctrl \
power_line_frequency=1 --device /dev/%k", \
SYMLINK+="dell-webcam"
EOF

It’s easy to test. Just turn flicker back on, reload the rules and watch the flicker in Cheese automatically disappear 🙂

v4l2-ctl --set-ctrl power_line_frequency=0
sudo udevadm control --reload-rules && sudo udevadm trigger

Of course I also tested with a reboot.

It’s easy to do with any webcam, just take a look on the USB bus for the vendor and product IDs. For example, here’s a Logitech C930e (which is probably the nicest webcam I’ve ever used, and also works perfectly under Fedora).

Bus 001 Device 022: ID 046d:0843 Logitech, Inc. Webcam C930e

So you would replace the following in your udev rule:

  • ATTRS{idVendor}==“046d”
  • ATTRS{idProduct}==“0843”
  • SYMLINK+=“c930e”

Note that SYMLINK is not necessary, it just creates an extra /dev entry, such as /dev/c930e, which is useful if you have multiple webcams.

Git hook to help with OpenStack development

I wrote a small Git hook which may be useful in helping OpenStack devs run tests (and any script they like) before a commit is made (see Superuser magazine article).

This way we can save everyone time in the review process by fixing simple issues before they break in the check-pipeline.

Installation is easy (see the GitHub page) and all prompts default to no, so that the dev can easily just hit Enter to skip and continue (but still be reminded).

Setting up OpenStack Ansible All-in-one behind a proxy

Setting up OpenStack Ansible (OSA) All-in-one (AIO) behind a proxy requires a couple of settings, but it should work fine (we’ll also configure the wider system). There are two types of git repos that we should configure for (unless you’re an OpenStack developer), those that use http (or https) and those that use the git protocol.

Firstly, this assumes an Ubuntu 14.04 server install (with at least 60GB of free space on / partition).

Continue reading ‘Setting up OpenStack Ansible All-in-one behind a proxy’