Tag Archive for 'theora'

Trying to kill Theora – MPEG LA extends royalty free use of H.264 for Internet streaming

So the MPEG LA has extended the royalty free life of Internet streaming H.264 video from the end of 2010 to the end of 2016. The majority of patents expire in 2028, so that will still give them plenty of time to collect on royalties, if we let them.

Make no mistake, this is about stifling the adoption of Theora in order to become the de-facto standard. MPEG LA is trying to kill Theora, but we must not let that happen! We need an open web.

If you use H.264 for ANY OTHER PURPOSE today, you still need a license. Yes, that means you Mr. Linux user ripping your DVD’s to H.264..

Ogm != Ogg

I just discovered that the Ogg Media format (OGM) is not a specification supported by Xiph Foundation. That’s right, OGM is not Ogg. OGM is an extension of Ogg which goes outside of the specification by adding support for DirectShow filters.

We get a lot of E-mail from people, demanding support for OGM. Of course they come to us, it’s called ‘Ogg.’ We’re the ‘Ogg People.’ We don’t support OGM. We didn’t write it, and we don’t have the resources to help people with it…

Ogg Vs Ogm file format are the same, the main difference is the first header in each stream. OGM uses several standardised header formats, audio, video and text, in order to make identifying unknown codecs easier in directshow (and subsequently other frameworks). ie with those three headers you can use any audio or video format you choose without have to write custom header parsing routines for each codec in the demuxer.

In other words ogmtools provides the standard du jeur for encapsulating various common-in-avi codecs in an Ogg bitstream, like ‘divx’, ‘mp3′ and so on.

The Ogg specification supports video (.ogv extension) and use of Ogm is discouraged.

YouTube HTML5 beta program launched, but without Theora support

Google has created an opt-in beta program for anyone wanting to test YouTube with the HTML5 tag rather than using Flash. There are a few caveats however, with the number one being that it’s still all H.264 video. No Theora to speak of, yet, but it’s possibly a step in the right direction!